Foxtrot

MA15 113 mins

About the film

Director: Samuel Maoz
Actors: Lior Ashkenazi, Sarah Adler, Yonatan Shiray
From first shot to last, Foxtrot makes demands on audiences and then richly rewards them. It's a riveting, deeply resonant achievement. 

Director Samuel Maoz’s (Lebanon) drama, won the Grand Jury Prize at the Venice Film Festival and was Israel’s (snubbed) submission to the Academy Awards, is a highly metaphorical triptych that’s trying to grapple with the quagmire of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 

Each of the three parts is stylistically and tonally distinct. The first throws you into a hothouse of intensity. Soldiers arrive at the home of a middle-aged couple to tell Dafna (Sarah Adler) and Michael Feldman (Lior Ashkenazi) that their son has been killed in the line of duty.
Ashkenazi, perhaps Israel's top star, has won the Ophir for best actor three times and puts all of his skill and experience to work as he plays a profoundly lost man raging against the storm.

The second has a hyper realistic, at times comical surrealism. At a remote desert checkpoint called Foxtrot, a quartet of young male soldiers spend their days checking the identification cards from the mostly Palestinian travellers who pass through the dusty gate, though more often they’re forced to lift it for stray camels.

While the third doubles back to Michael and his wife, still despondent over their son’s death and contemplating the legacy he left behind.

Foxtrot is also, of course, a dance and here it's an intricate, dazzling cinematic dance where the characters are doomed to repeat steps they didn’t choose and that get them precisely nowhere.
No matter what you're expecting, "Foxtrot" is not the film you expect it to be.
It's better.

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